‘Exceptional, reward well deserved’: crescents and beads?

In certain parts of Queensland it was the discovery of gold that was the main driving force behind the expansion of Europeans into the traditional lands of Aboriginal people. This was certainly the case in parts of Cape York Peninsula (CYP), where the discovery of the Palmer River goldfield in 1872 resulted in an estimated […]

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Aboriginal Women and the NMP

The black police … seemed to have full license to kidnap and ravish the women of the first tribe they came across after a depredation had taken place. Frequently I have seen them tie young gins* — yelling and struggling — to the backs of their horses and carry them off after a dispersal, after […]

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All buttoned up: archaeology in the outback

By Guest Blogger Uschi Artym Why are there so many buttons? And what were all the metal tags used for? (see Figure 1.) These were just two of the many questions asked by Flinders University students and archaeologists between 3-9 July 2017, who were at the time taking part in an ‘Indigenous Archaeology Field School’ in western […]

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Currency Lads and the Native Youth: mapping early white identity in Queensland

Through examining the spatial data shown on historical maps associated with the Native Mounted Police (NMP), in conjunction with archaeological evidence, many aspects of the early Qld frontier can be examined. Race relations, Aboriginal displacement, early white settlement, and even the politics of colonial identity can be investigated. During archival cartographic research into the NMP one […]

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One-sided histories

By Guest Blogger Jacinta Koolmatrie Between 2-9 July 2017 I participated in a Flinders University based field school in Boulia, Queensland as part of “The Archaeology of the Native Mounted Police” project. Fieldwork began on a Monday and started with an introduction by team member Associate Professor Heather Burke who explained what was currently known about the […]

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What’s in a Name?

Naming can be a means of identification, classification, control and transformation. For Europeans, the stability of their names—particularly their first names—is taken for granted. Both first and last names provide an anchor for the individual and connect them to family and place. For Aboriginal people names were much less stable but no less meaningful, often […]

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Archaeological Geophysics: The Future meets the Past

Archaeological geophysics techniques are tools to map, locate and produce images of buried cultural materials and features. There are several different methods that can be used depending upon the presence of different physical properties below the Earth’s surface. Differences between buried cultural materials, such as a pit, wall or burial, and the background soil will […]

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