‘To be Seen and Not Heard’: Children and the NMP

By Lynley Wallis and Heather Burke Given the work with which they were routinely engaged, it is hard to reconcile the idea of a Native Mounted Police camp replete with happy children scampering through the bush, bursting with laughter. But in many cases this must have been a relatively common occurrence since, as we noted […]

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Self Provisioning at Boralga

By Leanne Bateman Food rations were an important lifeline for the occupants of Native Mounted Police (NMP) camps, but it was often a tenuous lifeline at best. The cost of rations was a problem for the government, who had to constantly justify the existence of the NMP force to the taxpayer, who frequently complained that […]

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All buttoned up: archaeology in the outback

By Uschi Artym Why are there so many buttons? And what were all the metal tags used for? (see Figure 1.) These were just two of the many questions asked by Flinders University students and archaeologists between 3-9 July 2017, who were at the time taking part in an ‘Indigenous Archaeology Field School’ in western Queensland. Located approximately […]

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Archaeological Geophysics: The Future meets the Past

By Kelsey Lowe Archaeological geophysics techniques are tools to map, locate and produce images of buried cultural materials and features. There are several different methods that can be used depending upon the presence of different physical properties below the Earth’s surface. Differences between buried cultural materials, such as a pit, wall or burial, and the […]

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Excavating the Wondai Gumbal NMP camp site

“No man whatever his age, should be left by himself in such a lonely desolate spot.” (From a letter by Lt Francis Nicoll, Commander of Native Police, Condamine district in response to a letter of complaint from a local squatter in relation to accusations of ‘incompetence and intemperance’ at Wondai Gumbal 1857). In 1851 requests […]

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